Accessible Easter Egg Hunts

Create Your Own Egg Hunt
If your town doesn’t have an accessible Easter egg hunt you can always make one yourself! You can hide eggs in your own home or backyard. Consider having the eggs out in the open to make them easy to find. If you have several children in your home, select one color for each child. This ensures that everyone will get the same amount of eggs.

For Children in Wheelchairs
You can hide mini eggs and trinkets in a big Easter basket full of Easter basket grass/confetti that is at table level. This is also a fun activity for kids working on sensory issues. For children with vision impairments, you could look into purchasing beeping or talking Easter eggs.

Work on Skills While Having Fun
Older children may enjoy an Easter egg treasure hunt. Write clues on how to find deeply hidden Easter eggs. This is a good exercise for children learning to follow step-by-step instructions or working on vocabulary skills. Children can follow a series of clues such as: Look near the toaster in the kitchen; or you can put together a riddle by writing: I’m hiding behind a small appliance that makes things toasty.

Glow In The Dark Easter Egg Hunt
You can make the eggs glow by using glow-stick bracelets and LED finger lights. If you are hosting a fully inclusive egg hunt, a great idea would be to use beeping or talking Easter eggs as well. You might place a sound egg and a glow egg in the same spot so children could use either hearing or sight to find them, or both senses if applicable.

Easter Baskets
Are you looking for a healthier alternative to put in your child’s Easter basket this year? Here are a few ideas!

  • Egg-Shaped Chalk
  • Craft Kit
  • Spring Coloring Book and Crayons
  • Stickers
  • Puzzles
  • Bouncy Ball
  • Nail Polish
  • Small Rubber Animals
  • Cars
  • Legos
  • Play dough
  • Kite
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